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Monday, August 15, 2005

Don't change it, Mr. Secretary

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff is new on the job, and he's itching to make changes.

Understandable, a "new broom sweeps clean," yada yada.

Unfortunately, not all changes are good.

Since 9/11/2001, there have been exactly (let's count them) zero fatalities in the U.S. due to airplane security issues. Nada. Goose egg. The sale of Dr. Scholl's for shoes has probably gone up, as passengers being screened get to kick-off their Sunday shoes. But standing in my stocking feet for a few minutes is a small price to pay to have a greater peace of mind when I get on that plane.

If any changes need to be made, it's making things more strict. I won't go into a specific list of weaknesses in the current screening system. I've always thought that there's probably some warped person trolling the web for new sabotage ideas. But if you must do something to establish your authority, Mr. Secretary, make it a change to tighten things up, not loosen them. That'll make this traveler and his family sleep easier at 30,000 feet.


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Photo courtesy of Flickr.

3 Comments:

At 10:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

you must be an American, because all foreigners are treated like criminals upon entering the USA.
Scanning eyes, fingerprinting, double screening, luggage opened (and as a results lots of luggage being stolen)
Tighten security, no problem!
But we need to be treated all the same.
I am curious who the average American would feel if important valuable parts of his/her luggage is missing and you are being told that that is down part of the "USA security"

 
At 10:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

you must be an American, because all foreigners are treated like criminals upon entering the USA.
Scanning eyes, fingerprinting, double screening, luggage opened (and as a results lots of luggage being stolen)
Tighten security, no problem!
But we need to be treated all the same.
I am curious who the average American would feel if important valuable parts of his/her luggage is missing and you are being told that that is down part of the "USA security"

 
At 5:30 PM, Blogger Double Birdie said...

Anon -

You've raised some excellent points. Stolen items from your luggage is inexucusable, no matter where it happen. (I've had colleagues sent locked luggage on African airlines, the locks are broken off, and items are missing).
Every country has its requirements for entry. Americans must obtain a visa to go to other countries, even as non-Americans must have a visa to enter the U.S. If you feel like the security measures are draconian, you can:

1) institute the same draconian measures in your country for Americans coming in, or

2) you can choose not to enter the U.S.

 

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